Third Issue of Construction Newsletter Available

The third edition of the Living Hope Construction Update is available now, and there are several ways you can read it: online, on your computer, from a copy you print, or from a copy you pick up at the Welcome Center. As part of their communications during the project, Elzinga & Volkers, our construction management partners, provide this monthly newsletter to keep everyone–near or far–informed about progress.

Click above or follow this link to read it online. Note the controls at the bottom of the screen: the scale at the left allows you to zoom in for legibility; the arrows in the center let you page through; and the two diagonal arrows on the far right will show the newsletter full-screen.

If you prefer to download the newsletter to read it in a PDF viewer (like Adobe Reader) or print it on your home printer, follow this link to the PDF.

A limited number of printed copies will be available at the Welcome Center–while supplies last!

 

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New Edition of Construction Update Available

A new edition the the Living Hope Construction Update is available now, and there are several ways you can read it: online, on your computer, from a copy you print, or from a copy you pick up at the Welcome Center. As part of their communications during the project, Elzinga & Volkers, our construction management partners, provide this monthly newsletter to keep everyone–near or far–informed about progress.

Click above or follow this link to read it online. Note the controls at the bottom of the screen: the scale at the left allows you to zoom in for legibility; the arrows in the center let you page through; and the two diagonal arrows on the far right will show the newsletter full-screen.

If you prefer to download the newsletter to read it in a PDF viewer (like Adobe Reader) or print it on your home printer, follow this link to the PDF.

A limited number of printed copies will be available at the Welcome Center–while supplies last!

 

Update from Schematic Design Phase

On March 29, members and friends gathered after 11 a.m. worship to eat pizza–and to see the results of the Schematic Design Phase now nearing completion.

Ann Kansfield, pastor of Greenpoint Church in Brooklyn, New York, was our special guest representing our ministry partners, whose work we plan to support as a part of our capital campaign. Ann described the impact that Hope Church, especially through our youth and their sponsors, has had on Greenpoint’s ministry. She spoke of the optimism and spark of momentum represented by the painting of a fence during a summer service trip; she described their need to expand their food service kitchen, from which they feed 700 hungry people each week.

Lois Maassen described the Schematic Design work just complete. It’s a multi-disciplinary process involving the architects and electrical, structural, acoustical, and mechanical engineers; many Hope Church members participated in providing more detail about our vision. This phase is iterative work: design concepts sparked by requirements are checked for code or structural implications and then to confirm whether costs are in line with expectations. During this phase, we learned that what we’d like to accomplish for accessibility, hospitality and welcoming, sustainability, and flexibility will cost more than our target. There was a small amount of “scope creep” as we detailed our needs (especially in audio/visual systems). The bulk of the increased expense is due to the complexity of our building: Our lack of continuous attics or basements makes installation of heating, cooling, and fire suppression systems difficult. And finally, building inside the current courtyard, while it will help with sustainability by eliminating three long exterior walls, is a challenge.

Jim VanderMolen, architect from Elevate Studio, then presented the plans as currently envisioned.

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Inside the facility, Jim reviewed the evolutions since the previous version shared with the congregation. Principal changes included the east entrance to the sanctuary from the Gathering Area, opening the hallway to the youth room from the memorial garden entrance, and the addition of an exterior door to allocate storage-room space to outdoor maintenance supplies and equipment.

Floor Plan_onlyAnd finally, Jim shared renderings of interior spaces, noting that colors, materials, and finishes are at this point only suggestive, not specified.

Chapel Interior_SM

The rendering above shows the rose window at the south end of the chapel. The ceiling is contoured in both directions, reminiscent of canopies and tents. The niches on the left result from our existing architecture and can hold candles, sculptures, or flowers. The wall to the right is the storage shown on the floorplan–for chairs and tables or other furnishings when they’re not in use.

Gathering

This view of the Gathering Area is from the east-side entrance. From left to right, you can see the existing gallery wall; an additional conversational space outside of the chapel; the entry of the chapel; the hallway with the nursery door visible at the end; the glass wall of the reception area of the administrative offices; bookshelves as one option for a more accessible library collection; and then the existing hallway to the education wing and entry to Commons II.

Sam Martin, on behalf of the Living Hope Capital Campaign team, provided an update on progress to date and thinking about next steps. At this moment, we’ve received pledges from about a quarter of members; those who haven’t yet pledged (or those who’d like to reconsider their commitments) are encouraged to prayerfully consider their support. The end of May is the timeframe that will inform decision-making, but pledges received earlier are helpful to understanding our prospects. Sam outlined a number of additional possibilities for resources, including grants, rebates (especially for energy), and fundraising for specific projects.

The next step in the process is for Consistory, at a June meeting, to discern the scope of project to which we’d like to commit, given what we know about available resources.

There were a number of questions asked; while the meeting was not recorded, we’ll look to answer some of them in future posts at this website. If you have additional questions or comments, you can use this contact form or contact the church office or Lois Maassen.

 

 

 

 

 

MEP and Other Abbreviations

The Building and Grounds Ministry was asked to consider MEP (mechanical, electrical, and plumbing) issues for the entire facility, as well as weighing in on any other aspects of the facility that come into play in overall management and maintenance.

In mechanical, the ministry described their desire for HVAC (heat, ventilation, air conditioning) control from individual rooms, as well as from a central computer. As a user hosting a meeting in a room, it would be extremely helpful to be able to check a thermostat to see what the temperature is, and then to modify it from the room. We note that our expectations are affected by our current inability to control anything (from anywhere!), and that we need to remain certain that the upgrades we’re investing in now (replacing broken parts of the system) are on the path to our future intentions. We also note the importance of having people well-trained to operate the computer-based controls for the new system; this training is part of the current plan.

The ministry further expresses a desire to get all possible mechanical equipment out of the ceiling and into floor-level and below; for anything that must remain where it is, overflow pans and alarms for water leaks would help us avoid damage.

In electrical, the ministry observes that the kitchen and offices are both currently over capacity (that is, under-supplied), with space heaters in offices putting us “over the edge.”

For plumbing, the ministry notes that not all plumbing locations are currently used; we’ll want to be deliberate in where we place kitchen and clean-up fixtures to assure we’re investing wisely. Outside the facility, we could use additional external hose bibs (on the east side) for window cleaning, car washes, and other outdoor tasks. About 90 percent of our planted property is irrigated.

There was some dreaming about having snow-melt capability for the walkway and front steps. While that’s acknowledged to be an expense outside of what we’d planned, Paul Elzinga notes that there’s a larger plan for waste heat from the power plant to be piped to the library in a few years. We discussed whether we should include some piping now in those areas that are rebuilt to be prepared for that eventuality–in case there’s an opportunity.

Storage is on the minds of the ministry members: for tables, chairs, A/V equipment and associated screens and carts, sound systems, outdoor equipment like a ladder, the snowblower, and up to a skid of snow-melting supplies. This led to discussion about whether the location of the dumpsters will change, because if we need a “garage” outside of the main facility, there may be space there. An additional option mentioned after the meeting was to divide the current storage room where tables and chairs are stowed, adding an external door so that the outdoor equipment could be stored there.

We also talked about carpet-cleaning, because what we install will affect how we think about cleaning. Ric Beltran asks whether we should have our own carpet cleaner; we also talked about the advantages of carpet tiles that can be swapped or replaced when there’s damage or staining.

Inspiration in Traverse City

Hope Church’s Peter Boogaart shared the Michigan Interfaith Power and Light newsletter with the Living Hope team. It contains a case study on Central United Methodist Church of Traverse City; Peter finds interesting parallels to our project in their effort to retrofit a 100-year-old sanctuary.

You can read the whole case study on the website of Interfaith Power and Light; their purpose is to connect faith and sustainability.