August Edition of Construction Update Available

The August edition the the Living Hope Construction Update is available now, and there are several ways you can read it: online, on your computer, from a copy you print, or from a copy you pick up at the Welcome Center. As part of their communications during the project, Elzinga & Volkers, our construction management partners, provide this monthly newsletter to keep everyone–near or far–informed about progress.

Click above or follow this link to read it online. Note the controls at the bottom of the screen: the scale at the left allows you to zoom in for legibility; the arrows in the center let you page through; and the two diagonal arrows on the far right will show the newsletter full-screen.

If you prefer to download the newsletter to read it in a PDF viewer (like Adobe Reader) or print it on your home printer, follow this link to the PDF.

A limited number of printed copies will be available at the Welcome Center–while supplies last!

 

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Third Issue of Construction Newsletter Available

The third edition of the Living Hope Construction Update is available now, and there are several ways you can read it: online, on your computer, from a copy you print, or from a copy you pick up at the Welcome Center. As part of their communications during the project, Elzinga & Volkers, our construction management partners, provide this monthly newsletter to keep everyone–near or far–informed about progress.

Click above or follow this link to read it online. Note the controls at the bottom of the screen: the scale at the left allows you to zoom in for legibility; the arrows in the center let you page through; and the two diagonal arrows on the far right will show the newsletter full-screen.

If you prefer to download the newsletter to read it in a PDF viewer (like Adobe Reader) or print it on your home printer, follow this link to the PDF.

A limited number of printed copies will be available at the Welcome Center–while supplies last!

 

New Edition of Construction Update Available

A new edition the the Living Hope Construction Update is available now, and there are several ways you can read it: online, on your computer, from a copy you print, or from a copy you pick up at the Welcome Center. As part of their communications during the project, Elzinga & Volkers, our construction management partners, provide this monthly newsletter to keep everyone–near or far–informed about progress.

Click above or follow this link to read it online. Note the controls at the bottom of the screen: the scale at the left allows you to zoom in for legibility; the arrows in the center let you page through; and the two diagonal arrows on the far right will show the newsletter full-screen.

If you prefer to download the newsletter to read it in a PDF viewer (like Adobe Reader) or print it on your home printer, follow this link to the PDF.

A limited number of printed copies will be available at the Welcome Center–while supplies last!

 

Update from Schematic Design Phase

On March 29, members and friends gathered after 11 a.m. worship to eat pizza–and to see the results of the Schematic Design Phase now nearing completion.

Ann Kansfield, pastor of Greenpoint Church in Brooklyn, New York, was our special guest representing our ministry partners, whose work we plan to support as a part of our capital campaign. Ann described the impact that Hope Church, especially through our youth and their sponsors, has had on Greenpoint’s ministry. She spoke of the optimism and spark of momentum represented by the painting of a fence during a summer service trip; she described their need to expand their food service kitchen, from which they feed 700 hungry people each week.

Lois Maassen described the Schematic Design work just complete. It’s a multi-disciplinary process involving the architects and electrical, structural, acoustical, and mechanical engineers; many Hope Church members participated in providing more detail about our vision. This phase is iterative work: design concepts sparked by requirements are checked for code or structural implications and then to confirm whether costs are in line with expectations. During this phase, we learned that what we’d like to accomplish for accessibility, hospitality and welcoming, sustainability, and flexibility will cost more than our target. There was a small amount of “scope creep” as we detailed our needs (especially in audio/visual systems). The bulk of the increased expense is due to the complexity of our building: Our lack of continuous attics or basements makes installation of heating, cooling, and fire suppression systems difficult. And finally, building inside the current courtyard, while it will help with sustainability by eliminating three long exterior walls, is a challenge.

Jim VanderMolen, architect from Elevate Studio, then presented the plans as currently envisioned.

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Inside the facility, Jim reviewed the evolutions since the previous version shared with the congregation. Principal changes included the east entrance to the sanctuary from the Gathering Area, opening the hallway to the youth room from the memorial garden entrance, and the addition of an exterior door to allocate storage-room space to outdoor maintenance supplies and equipment.

Floor Plan_onlyAnd finally, Jim shared renderings of interior spaces, noting that colors, materials, and finishes are at this point only suggestive, not specified.

Chapel Interior_SM

The rendering above shows the rose window at the south end of the chapel. The ceiling is contoured in both directions, reminiscent of canopies and tents. The niches on the left result from our existing architecture and can hold candles, sculptures, or flowers. The wall to the right is the storage shown on the floorplan–for chairs and tables or other furnishings when they’re not in use.

Gathering

This view of the Gathering Area is from the east-side entrance. From left to right, you can see the existing gallery wall; an additional conversational space outside of the chapel; the entry of the chapel; the hallway with the nursery door visible at the end; the glass wall of the reception area of the administrative offices; bookshelves as one option for a more accessible library collection; and then the existing hallway to the education wing and entry to Commons II.

Sam Martin, on behalf of the Living Hope Capital Campaign team, provided an update on progress to date and thinking about next steps. At this moment, we’ve received pledges from about a quarter of members; those who haven’t yet pledged (or those who’d like to reconsider their commitments) are encouraged to prayerfully consider their support. The end of May is the timeframe that will inform decision-making, but pledges received earlier are helpful to understanding our prospects. Sam outlined a number of additional possibilities for resources, including grants, rebates (especially for energy), and fundraising for specific projects.

The next step in the process is for Consistory, at a June meeting, to discern the scope of project to which we’d like to commit, given what we know about available resources.

There were a number of questions asked; while the meeting was not recorded, we’ll look to answer some of them in future posts at this website. If you have additional questions or comments, you can use this contact form or contact the church office or Lois Maassen.

 

 

 

 

 

A Note on Dividing Space

This topic has come up in several discussions, because many of our meeting places are used for multiple purposes.

For the benefit of the architect, we’ll summarize in this one place: Having done an audit of concurrent events and group sizes, and taking into account the trade-offs required for a room to be divisible, we think it will be most workable to keep the divider between current Commons I and Commons II, keep room 106 divisible, and add a divider to the new youth room.

Rooms we will not assume must be divisible are the large Commons room and the chapel.

For any room that has a divider, we’re hoping for ease of use and reasonable acoustical separation.

Administrative Offices

The biggest functional change with the administrative offices is to move the primary entrance to be visible and accessible from the Gathering Area. Walking through the space from that entrance:

officesWe don’t need a reception area inside the office, but we do have a “public” mail station, in effect, to which many visitors to the office will need access. Currently, that function is served by a four- or five-drawer lateral file. Next accessed by staff as well as others is the copy machine, which is a large floor-standing model.

That copier is most often used by the church receptionist, who needs quick access to it and to greeting visitors at the office front entrance.

It’s hoped that the room behind the reception station can be used in place of the current library as a frequent meeting place for groups of 8 to 10 people. This requires the accommodation of a table and chairs, as well as supplies storage and coffee preparation–and a door to the outside hall. We presume that the door between the offices and this room can be locked from inside the offices.

The private offices for pastors are shown on the current plan as being of different sizes; we have co-pastors, so there’s a logic in having them be the same size if that’s possible. However, meetings of up to four people tend to gravitate to Jill’s office, so if having that office larger makes a difference in accommodating those meetings, it can make sense for the offices to differ. Both pastors currently have U-shaped work surfaces, including a peninsula, as well as a small round conference table with four chairs. And lots of book shelves. Natural light, views, and visual and acoustical privacy are important for both of these roles.

The current plan shows an additional private office. We’d like to make that space part of an open office, which gives us more flexibility for evolution of staff and roles in the future. We assume we will do more detailed programming for that space, but envision it including workstations for the directors of Children’s and Youth Ministries, the church administrator, the financial administrator (and, often, a seminary intern); one or two additional touch-down spaces, too. Varying degrees of privacy are required, culminating with the financial administrator, who both works with confidential documents and is handicapped by distractions.

In a change to our previous thinking, we envision the less-frequent office-users having workspace in the office just east of the current room 106. This includes the Kids Hope coordinators (a job share currently), seminary interns (currently two), and the parish nurse. These roles are generally less interdependent on other church staff, as well as requiring less access to office time concurrently. Each needs personal storage; a conference table would allow them to have small meetings adjacent.

This rough sketch serves our current needs for the design process; many questions remain unanswered and will require more detailed programming–but will be more productive closer to actual construction. The Living Hope Design Team will update along the way; check back for updates to this description or additional posts at the LivingHopeRCA project blog.